Recent Changes

Sunday, April 19

  1. page Larkin Turman - Eastern Gray Squirrel edited The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) {Larkin_Turman_-_1.jpg} The Eastern Gray Squ…

    The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)
    {Larkin_Turman_-_1.jpg}
    The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) donloaded
    on 10/05/2009
    Natural Habitat and Location
    {Larkin_Turman_2.JPG}
    The Range of the Eastern Gray Squirrel downloaded on 10/15/09
    The Eastern Gray squirrel can be found in the eastern and mid-western United States, as well as southernly portions of the eastern provinces of Canada. The squirrel find its home in big, deciduous trees; examples are White Oaks, American Beeches, American Elms, Red Maples, and Sweetgums. They will either reside in a cavity already in the tree, or in a nest they build out of leaves. During the winter when the trees leaves are gone it is easy to spot the nests.
    {Larkin_Turman_3.JPG}
    The Eastern Gray squirrel eating downloaded on 10/20/09
    Niche
    The Eastern Gray squirrel eats mainly nuts, acorns, maple, flowers, seeds, some fruits, fungi, insects, baby birds and bird eggs, amphibians, and sometimes each other. Squirrels are usually seventeen to twenty inches long and have grayish brown fur, and pale fur for their bellies. The squirrels live in trees in which they make a nest. The Eastern Gray squirrel is perfect for mild summers and snowfall in winters because of its fur and ability to store nuts away for the long winter. There is competition between the squirrel and the Pileated Woodpeckers over tree cavities which are used for shelters. The squirrels usually win. Eastern Gray squirrels have two litters a year, one in the spring, and one in the late summer. Litters usually comprise of two or three young. The squirrel can usually start having young of its own when it is twelve months old. The squirrel is especially active in the mornings and evenings and is around all year round. The squirrel likes to bury the nuts it finds in different locations so it can find them during the winter. For the most part the squirrels are able to find the nuts they buried. The Eastern Gray squirrel congregate in groups, families live in their own nests. The squirrel is often preyed upon by hawks, owls, snakes, raccoons, and the Red Fox.
    Population Expansion
    The Eastern Gray squirrel could fill in the niche of the Delmarva Fox squirrel because not only does the Eastern Gray squirrel eat similar foods, but it also inhabits similar terrains. The main reason the Delmarva Fox squirrel is extinct is because the land it lives on is being destroyed in way of human development. The Eastern Gray squirrel lives in similar types of topography as the Delmarva Fox, eats similar foods (mostly nuts), and are preyed by similar animals (hawks, snakes) and therefore can take over the Delmarva Fox's niche.
    Species in Competition
    The Eastern Gray squirrel has been able to overcome habitat destruction by expanding into other places, unlike to Delmarva Fox squirrel. The Eastern Gray squirrel is able to adapt to changes in its environment leading to its survival. Since the Delmarva Fox squirrel does not adapt as well its population has declined. The Fox squirrel, of which the Delmarva Fox squirrel is a family member, are also more prone to certain diseases than the Eastern Gray squirrel making it more likely to not do as well. It would not take long for the Eastern Gray squirrel to fill the niche of the Delmarva Fox squirrel since they are so similar.
    Citations:
    "Eastern Gray Squirrel." Absolute Astronomy . N.p., 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.
    <http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Eastern_Gray_Squirrel>.
    "Eastern Gray Squirrel." eNature. N.p., 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.
    <http://www.enature.com/flashcard/
    show_flash_card.asp?recordNumber=MA0118>.
    "The Eastern Gray Squirrel." Encyclopedia Britannica. 2008 ed. Vol. 7. Print. 32
    vols.
    Picture Citations:
    Distrubution of Eastern Gray Squirrel. Chart. Hinterland Who's Who. Canadian
    Wildlife Service & Canadian Wildlife Federation, n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.
    <http://www.hww.ca/hww2.asp?id=89&cid=8>.
    Basterfield, Peter. Eastern Gray Squirrel. 2009. Birdfinders. N.p., 2009. Web.
    20 Oct. 2009. <http://www.birdfinders.co.uk/news/
    canada-2009-pics.htm>.
    Eastern Gray Squirrel. N.d. Mammals. ParKids NYC, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.
    <http://www.nycgovparks.org/kids/index.php?page=library§ion=mammals>.

    (view changes)
    1:34 pm

Friday, October 30

  1. msg Locked Out of Wiki But Have Info Here message posted Locked Out of Wiki But Have Info Here Dear Mr. Currence, I cannot post my info because the page is locked. I have attached my work and…
    Locked Out of Wiki But Have Info Here
    Dear Mr. Currence,

    I cannot post my info because the page is locked. I have attached my work and will also email it to you

    Common and Scientific Name (Respectively)
    Goliath Frog
    Conraua Goliath

    Natural Habitat and Locations
    The Goliath Frog's natural habitat is especially important because the Goliath successfully inhabits such as small area of the world. Goliath Frogs have only been found in quick, powerful rainforest rivers on the coast of Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea in Western Africa. With their massive size, humans have tried to bring Golitah Frogs into American zoos, but these attempts have proved futile. The Goliath Frogs did not mate or survive well in the small unnatural spaces.

    They are from 17 to 32 cm long and from 600 to 3250 grams in weight. They have a flattened, wide body with a triangular head. Their dorsal skin is granular and greenish brown and the ventral skin is a lighter yellowish green. The hind legs are long, front legs are shorter and stout, and all of the feet are extensively webbed. Their eyes can be nearly 2.5 cm in diameter.

    Niche

    Size: The Goliath Frog is the world's largest frog, sometimes reaching the size of a house cat. Some even weigh more than seven pounds and can grow to be around 12.5 feet long. As tadpoles though, surprisingly, the young Goliath frogs are similarly sized to other frogs. Goliath Frogs can be from 17 to 32 cm long and from 600 to 3250 grams in weight.

    Diet: The Goliath Frog lives its early life feeding on the sandy, rocky, bottoms of the rainforest rivers. It is here that the Goliath Frog tadpoles (who are vegetarians in the early stages of life) feed on Dicraea warmingii warmingii, a plant growing here. The full grown Goliath Frog adopts a more carniverous lifestyle, relying on insects, crustaceans, fish, amphibians, mollusks, small mammals, newts, salamanders, and smaller frog (basically other amphibians too).

    Climate and Housing Requirements: A Goliath Frog depends on small amphibians for sustenance, meaning that tropical rivers running by dense forests are ideal locations. Furthermore, at birth, the Goliath frog must have an easily accessed vegetarian option found in water, primarily Dicraea warmingii warmingii. The colors of such an environment allow the dull brownish green frogs to blend in and catch prey easier.

    Relationships: Goliath Frogs feed on Dicraea warmingii warmingii at birth. This relationship only benefits the Goliath Frog tadpoles. As grow older and larger, they depend more and more on other animals for food. Humans often try to capture the elusive Goliath Frog to export to American zoos. The Goliath Frog sells for $3,000 in the U.S., yet Goliath Frogs are known to not breed well in captivity. Native people also depend on this giant animal for food. Even more, humans encroachment on the wild land to build dams and other technological advances. Humans are the only known predator to Goliath Frogs.

    Reproduction/Birth: Since male Goliath Frogs do not have vocal sacs, they cannot attract mates through calls. Instead, some have noted that the Goliath Frogs make a low whistling sound by holding open their mouth, which the female recognizes and follows the source. After mating, female Goliath Frogs lay a couple hundred eggs (each about 3.5mm in diameter) in the bottom of rivers, the eggs sticking to the vegetation there. Over the course of the next 75 – 90 days, the tadpoles hatch and grow about 5 cm long. No information exists about the frequency and timing of their breading. After laying the eggs, there is no incentive for the female or male to ensure the eggs' successful birth.

    Why is the Goliath Frog endangered?

    The Goliath Frog is largely endangered because of human contact. Some native humans consider the big meaty organism a delicacy. Others attempt to keep them as pets for their intriguing size. Still others indirectly kill off Goliath Frogs by capturing and importing them to zoos. Humans have further hurt the Goliath Frog by destroying some of its environment (deforestation for agriculture and timber) and building dams (which can interfere with the breeding patterns of the frogs). Ultimately, humans' role in the endangerment of the Golaith Frog is especially important because the Goliath Frogs have not survived well in captivity, meaning that the protection of the minute habitat they have on the Coast of Western Africa, may be their only chance at survival.
    The population of Goliath Frogs has been cut in half in three generations, causing the International Union for the Conversation of Nature (ICUN) to put it on the endangered species list in 2007. The difference between threatened and endangered is that endangered means that a species will likely become extinct soon, while a threatened species is likely to become and endangered species. The Goliath Frog is currently not protected under any specific trade laws. People continue to be fascinated by these epically sized creatures and many continue to try to catch them. Luckily though, they are difficult to spot because of their camouflage. On the other hand, people's fascination with the Goliath Frogs may, lead to the disappearance of the Goliath Frogs. If people continue to hunt the frogs, and breeding the frogs in captivity continues to not yield positive results, the only way for the frogs to survive is through protection of their local habitat. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 would have an affect on the sale of Goliath Frogs, but only in the US, leaving them largely unprotected. Cameroon is making some effort to curtail the trade of the frogs by only allowing 300 to be exported each year. The EPA has also ruled that permits will be required for the legal purchase of Goliath Frogs in the US. These laws, though, cannot make up for the Goliath Frogs' suffering habitat. In summary, for the frogs to live, their environment must too.
    8:58 pm

Monday, October 26

  1. page Period 2 - Endangered Species Project edited ... Casey Goldvale Sandhill Crane Whooping Crane (Endangered) Noah Goodin Segen Habte
    ...
    Casey Goldvale
    Sandhill Crane
    Whooping Crane
    (Endangered)

    Noah Goodin
    Segen Habte
    (view changes)
    2:25 am

Thursday, October 22

  1. page Period 3 - Endangered Species Project edited ... Hieu Hoang Leatherback Turtle Ocean Sunfish (Endangered) Evan Holliday Scott Lawrence
    ...
    Hieu Hoang
    Leatherback Turtle
    Ocean Sunfish
    (Endangered)

    Evan Holliday
    Scott Lawrence
    (view changes)
    5:30 pm
  2. page Period 3 - Endangered Species Project edited ... Emerly Marquez Martekor Martey Black Footed Ferret Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake
    ...
    Emerly Marquez
    Martekor Martey
    Black Footed Ferret
    Southwestern Speckled
    Rattlesnake
    (view changes)
    4:50 pm
  3. page Period 3 - Endangered Species Project edited ... Semere Hagos Hieu Hoang Leatherback Turtle Evan Holliday Scott Lawrence
    ...
    Semere Hagos
    Hieu Hoang
    Leatherback Turtle
    Evan Holliday
    Scott Lawrence
    (view changes)
    4:47 pm
  4. page Tanisha Calliste- Desert Pupfish edited ... As a way to rest, the desert pupfish tends to barrie its self under the sand or dirt and when …
    ...
    As a way to rest, the desert pupfish tends to barrie its self under the sand or dirt and when it awakens, it swims out of the barrier and swims around for food.
    {calliste_read_5.jpg} Longjaw Mudsucker (downloaded 10/22/2009)
    ...
    desert pupfish.
    Sources
    http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1894/GG-25.1
    Size of fish picture: http://wfrc.usgs.gov/research/aquatic%20ecology/STSaiki6.htm
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/05/27/PUPFISH.TMP
    First desert pupfish Picture: http://billwilliamsriver.org/BWR_Library/images_wildlife_fish.htm
    Second Picture:

    Picture of Dos Palmas: http://www.californiadesert.gov/resources.php?code=dpp

    (view changes)
    3:17 pm
  5. page Tanisha Calliste- Desert Pupfish edited ... {calliste_read_6.jpg} Past and preasent location of the Desert pupfish (downloaded 10/22/09) …
    ...
    {calliste_read_6.jpg} Past and preasent location of the Desert pupfish (downloaded 10/22/09)
    Desert Pupfish
    {Calliste_read_1.jpg}About 4 to 500 years ago, they were located in the Colorado River but after the Colorado River flooded the Salton Sea, The Desert pupfish colonized in the Salton Sea. The Salton Sea was made up of pools, marshes and drains which supported all sized fish. {Calliste_read_1.jpg} Desert Pupfish
    ...
    Downloaded 10/5/09 {calliste_read_9.jpg} Salton Sea (downloaded 10/22/09)
    Habitat
    The Desert Pupfish Is located mainly located in the marshes, streams and pools of Southern Arizona and California.
    ...
    104 degrees.
    Niche
    Before they ended up in Dos palmas, they were washed into the Salton Sea from the Colorado River.
    {calliste_read_8.jpg} Average Size of Desert Pupfish Downloaded 10/22/09) Niche

    Diet:
    The Desert Pupfish eats the blue, green and brown alge off of the bottom of the water (marsh, stream, pools, rivers ect....) and small aquatic insects.
    ...
    As a way to rest, the desert pupfish tends to barrie its self under the sand or dirt and when it awakens, it swims out of the barrier and swims around for food.
    {calliste_read_5.jpg} Longjaw Mudsucker (downloaded 10/22/2009)
    About 4 to 500 years ago, they were located in the Colorado River but after the Colorado River flooded the Salton Sea, The DesertThe desert pupfish colonized in the Salton Sea. The Salton Sea was made up of pools, marshes and drains which supported all sized fish. It eats the
    ...
    desert pupfish.
    Sources
    http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1894/GG-25.1
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endangered_species).Size of fish picture: http://wfrc.usgs.gov/research/aquatic%20ecology/STSaiki6.htm
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/05/27/PUPFISH.TMP
    First Picture: http://billwilliamsriver.org/BWR_Library/images_wildlife_fish.htm
    (view changes)
    3:14 pm
  6. 3:10 pm
  7. 3:06 pm

More